Please note that we are currently populating this page to ensure it covers as many questions from residents as possible – visit the site again over the next few months to see more FAQs.

Why has a variation for planning application been submitted re the planned opening hours for the community centre?

As part of the original planning application for the community centre (P/17/2344/2), the Committee report (dated 31/1/18) provided guidance for opening hours for the centre, which stated in section 10:

No public access to the premises shall be allowed other than between the hours of 8.00am and 11.00pm, Monday to Saturday, and 8.30am and 10.00pm Sundays or recognised Bank Holidays.

However in the final planning permission decision document, an error was made in the correlating section:

No public access to the premises shall be allowed other than between the hours of 8.00am and 11.00pm, Monday to Saturday, and the premises shall not open on 8.30am and 10.00pm Sundays or recognised Bank Holidays.

Since the final planning permission decision document was misaligned with the original Committee report and recommendations during the public planning meeting, we were advised to submit a variation of the planning condition 10 (P/18/1792/2) to address the anomaly in the wording. This was submitted at the start of September.

Why can’t the site stay as green space?

 

The site was never intended to remain as green space. As part of the original Section 106 Agreement for the estate, the land was set aside for shops, a place of worship, a health centre and a community centre.

The Section 106 Agreement stated that if these do not go ahead the land reverts back to William Davis for residential housing. Please see question below for an update on this.

 

What has happened to the shops, and place of worship that were on the original planning application?

 

The Grange Park Centre group has been working towards building a new Community Centre, and have not been involved in the rest of the land.

In May 2018, William Davis submitted three planning applications relating to the site. Full details can be found on the Charnwood Planning Portal by searching for the planning application number stated below.

1. Applied for a discharge of obligations under Section 106A of P/00/2078/2: Provisions relating to part of the Local Centre on Grange Park development, P/18/0914/2.

This relates to release from provision of the following aspects of the original Section 106 Agreement due to a lack of demand: 0.5 ha for shopping or other commercial uses and 0.3 ha for community health and welfare development, including one place of worship, doctor or dentist, or such other health and welfare facilities and community uses.

This discharge of obligations does not affect provision for the Grange Park Centre community centre.

2. Planning application for 30 houses, land off Highland Drive/Knox Road, P/18/0888/2. This is on land adjacent to the planned community centre and play area.

3. Planning application for Play Areas on Grange Park Estate, P/18/0893/2.

The ‘view related documents’ section includes detailed information about the equipment that is proposed on the Highland Drive/Knox Road play park, and the Allendale Road play park (by the roundabout).

 

Why is the Community Centre needed?

 

The Grange Park area, located in the south-west of Loughborough, is a growing residential development with no local facilities. Plans for a community centre have been in place since 2009, as part of a “Local Centre”, which included flats over shops, place of worship, health centre and associated parking.

The evidence of need for a community centre comes from a Feasibility Study and a Community Needs Assessment, both commissioned in 2012. These were published in 2013, and demonstrated that there is demand for a community venue.

In addition, the Grange Park Centre group carried out various consultation activities over the past six years to hear from residents in the area. People told us they wanted a centre where they can take part in a range of community activities to improve health, meet new people and positively engage children and young people. You can find further information of all our consultation activities on our website here.

We believe that the centre will help build a more cohesive, supportive community. We have been actively building links between the Grange Park, Shelthorpe and Haddon Way communities with support from Charnwood Borough Council, local agencies and groups. Across all areas there is very strong support for a new facility. You can read more about the background to the Grange Park Centre here.

 

Who are the Grange Park Centre Trustees and Committee members?

 

Grange Park Centre is a registered charity (1157806) with four Trustees and a working committee. The group includes representatives from Grange Park, Shelthorpe and Haddon Way areas of the Shelthorpe ward:

Trustees:
Paul Gadd (Chair)
Andy Neville
John Masters
Nigel Trasler

Working committee:
Joanne Lipman (Secretary)
Andrew Bowler (Treasurer)
Helen Smith
Ingrid Cunningham
Jay Parmar
Rev. Sue Willetts

For details of upcoming meetings held at Outwoods Edge Primary School, please see right-hand side of window, under Recent Posts.

 

What activities will take place at the Community Centre?

 

There are many ideas for activities and services that could be run at the centre, but nothing has been finalised as yet. Data from engagement with stakeholders and consultation activities tells us there is a need and demand for sports clubs, children’s groups, assistance in education, skills and training, health and fitness activities, business hub, counselling and advice services, parent and toddler groups.

 

What services will be provided for people with disabilities?

 

The centre will be designed to comply with building regulations to ensure that disabled people are able to integrate within the activities.

It is the intention that the committee and centre management will not be running any of the activities at the centre – our goal is to provide a facility which can be used by groups in the community. Activities could include promoting health, well-being, exercise and community cohesion.

We will be contacting local groups to inform them about the new facility, and also inviting others to develop new ideas which they can run from the centre. We will encourage groups using the centre to involve all groups within our society.

 

Can you confirm you will be having a changing place within the building for disabled visitors?

 

When we first started work on the plans for the community centre, it included disabled facilities.

During the last few months of 2017, a local resident asked us whether we could include a Changing Place within the Centre. Unfortunately, this was too late within the design process and confines of the budget to include within the design package for the planning application process at the start of December.

However, we did have lots of discussions and agreed to increase the size of the disabled facilities as much as possible to 2.5m x 2.9m within the constraints of the building footprint. This included moving some internal walls, strengthening one internal wall and moving the position of the doors into the main hall to accommodate a larger space. The larger room would accommodate a mobile hoist, adjustable height changing table, sink and wash basin. The size of the disabled facilities does not fully comply with the specification of changing places requirements as specified by the Changing Places Consortium (http://www.changing-places.org), and therefore could not be called a changing place. However we do feel that this hybrid solution will have significant benefits in providing equipment which would previously not have been possible.

The additional finance required to install the mobile hoist and adjustable height changing table will be outside of the funding we are looking for, for the building. However, we have a fund-raising plan to look for grants to fund this. One of the local residents has offered to assist us with looking for this funding, but we are happy for others to assist too.

 

Why has the planned location of the Community Centre changed?

 

The exact location of the proposed community centre had to be agreed between William Davis and Charnwood Borough Council as part of the Section 106 Agreement.

A planning application for the proposed Grange Park Community Centre was approved by the Planning Committee in February 2018, with the final position of the building reflecting feedback received from residents.

Details of the approved planning application P/17/2344/2, including the agreed position of the Centre, can be viewed on the Charnwood Borough Council’s Planning Portal.

 

What impact will the new Community Centre have on traffic?

 

As part of the planning application process for the Grange Park Centre, the Highways Agency assessed the area and traffic levels.

We will actively promote, as part of the Green Policy for the Centre, that people use alternative means of travel, where possible.

 

What impact will the Community Centre have on parking in the area?

 

The Centre will have its own dedicated car park. We will work with residents and community groups using the centre, to tackle inconsiderate parking.

 

Has the site actually been purchased to build the centre?

 

The Section 106 Agreement on the land for the community centre expired on 31 August 2017 and as such, the land is still owned by William Davis Ltd. We are currently awaiting legal documents from William Davis Ltd for a proposal to the Grange Park Centre charity to secure the land for future generations.

 

What is an S106 Agreement?

 

Planning obligations under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended), commonly known as S106 agreements, are a mechanism which make a development proposal acceptable in planning terms, that would not otherwise be acceptable. They are focused on site specific mitigation of the impact of development. S106 Agreements are often referred to as ‘developer contributions’ along with highway contributions and the Community Infrastructure Levy.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990/8/section/106

The common uses of planning obligations are to secure affordable housing, and to specify the type and timing of this housing; and to secure financial contributions to provide infrastructure or affordable housing. However these are not the only uses for an S106 obligation. An S106 obligation can:

  1. restrict the development or use of the land in any specified way;
  2. require specified operations or activities to be carried out in, on, under or over the land;
  3. require the land to be used in any specified way; or
  4. require a sum or sums to be paid to the authority (or, to the Greater London Authority) on a specified date or dates or periodically.

The Section 106 Agreement for the area on the Grange Park estate specifies that Charnwood Borough Council will purchase the land for £1 if a viable, long-term development can be found for the site. However, if after a 10-year period the land has not been built upon, it reverts to the developer for housing.

 

When does the community centre land revert back to housing?

 

The S106 Agreement on the land for the Community Centre expired on 31 August 2017, and as such, the land is still owned by William Davis Ltd. We are currently awaiting legal documents from William Davis Ltd for a proposal to the Grange Park Centre charity to secure the land for future generations.

 

What are the timescales for the project?

 

May 2018

  • Begun the final stage of the tendering process to select a main building contractor
  • Launched ‘Sponsor-a-Brick‘ fundraising campaign

June 2018

  • Securing the land: working through the legal process with William Davis Ltd for a proposal to safeguard the land for community activities for future generations

July 2018

  • Appointment of main contractor

September 2018

  • We hope to start building!

April 2019

  • Grand opening!

 

What happens if the total is not raised?

 

We are in the process of looking at a number of grant applications and businesses. We were involved in a number of meetings with funders and businesses in May and have received a really positive response. On 18 May 2018, we launched the ‘Sponsor-a-brick‘ appeal to raise funds from the local community. You can see a running total of the amount raised for the Sponsor-a-brick appeal on the website here.

If the fundraising target is not achieved, then the Committee would look to carrying out a value engineer process to reduce the costs of elements of the design, e.g. exploring alternative materials, or delivering the project in phases.

In accordance with charity guidance, any grant or donations received for the specific purpose of building the community centre (restricted funds) will be:

  • used for the intended purpose;
  • used for a different purpose of the charity with the agreement of the donor; or
  • returned to the donor.

 

How will the construction of the centre be managed?

 

We have already been out to tender in April for the main contractor, however a number of potential contractors dropped out of the process because of other commitments. As a result, we have instigated a second tender process, which is currently underway and will be completed during June. This has looked at providing additional value engineering solutions to ensure the project comes within budget.

We hope to appoint a contractor in July 2018, and then communicate details of the construction plan in August.

 

Where can I view a list of the questions that the Grange Park Centre group have answered about the project?

 

The complete set of questions and answers prepared for the meeting on 13 December 2017 can be viewed here.

Please email help@grangeparkcentre.org.uk if you would like any further information.

 

Where can I find your Data Protection policy?

 

You can download our data protection policy here.